Qualitative interview research: Family background and crime: the relationship between family background and involvement children- aged between 12 and 18, in criminal activities in the United States of America.

Qualitative interview research: Family background and crime: the relationship between family background and involvement children- aged between 12 and 18, in criminal activities in the United States of America.

Some notes on Assessment 1:

Qualitative interview research report

 

You are required to produce a 1,800 word research report, organised under the following subheadings (a-d). I have used bullet points to indicate some of the ways in which you might respond to each of these subheadings:

 

  1. research design

‘This section of your research report should outline your chosen topic, research objectives and methodological approach’

  • Topic – what you decided to ask questions about (i.e. attitudes towards illegal filesharing)
  • Objectives – in more specific terms, how you set out to explore your topic, and the kind of questions you wanted to explore (i.e. to explore young people’s understanding of ‘criminal behaviour’ in relation to filesharing technologies)
  • Methodological approach – methodologically, how you set out to do this (i.e. a semi-structured interview)? Why is this method appropriate for your chosen research? How does it relate to your approach to knowledge (epistemology)? Your approach to the nature of social reality (ontology)?

 

  1. analysis

‘a summary of themes identified in your research and an outline of your analysis and interpretation of these preliminary findings’

  • Describe the themes that you found in your interview: what is their significance? What is your understanding of them? How do they address or shed light upon your research questions? Do they complicate or expand those questions? What, in other words, does your interview ‘tell you’?
  • Your analysis will need to draw on existing theories. You might usefully consider how your interpretation of your interview corresponds with – or perhaps even challenges – published research in the same area.

 

  1. critical reflection

‘a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of your research approach’

  • What kind of knowledge did your approach produce? What are qualitative interviews good at finding out? What are they less good at finding out?

 

  1. future development

‘recommendations for future research in the area you have chosen’

  • Given more time and resources, how might you expand or extend your research? What other methodological approaches might usefully contribute to research in your chosen area?

 

 

 

 

Appendix

Remember you need to include as an appendix to your research report the following items (not included in your wordcount):

  • A research information sheet
    • you should have produced this before your interview, in order to explain your research to your interviewee
  • A completed consent form
    • this should have been signed by your interview to indicate their agreement to being interviewed
  • Your interview transcript
    • It is up to you whether you hand in a ‘clean’ or ‘coded’ version of your interview transcript. Consult the qualitative interview checklist if you are not sure about how to present your transcript.

 

 

 

Make sure it should be:

  • Information reasonably full and accurate
  • Well presented
  • Logical, coherent and lucid
  • Appropriate selection of content/ theory/ style in key areas
  • Clear identification of the issues
  • Evidence of wide and relevant reading
  • Appropriate application of theory
  • Evidence of evaluation/ justification/ critical thought
  • Referencing relevant and accurate
  • Clear evidence of understanding
  • Grammar, spelling and punctuation accurate
  • Good focus on module’s aims and themes
  • Conclusions well argued and substantiated